Tin Man by Sarah Winman

PUBLISHER: TINDER PRESS
PUBLICATION DATE: July 27th, 2017
RATING: ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆ ☆
GOODREADS

It begins with a painting won in a raffle: fifteen sunflowers, hung on the wall by a woman who believes that men and boys are capable of beautiful things.

And then there are two boys, Ellis and Michael, who are inseparable.
And the boys become men, and then Annie walks into their lives, and it changes nothing and everything.

If only I could erase my memory and appreciate this story for the first time all over again.

This story was absolutely beautiful, and just how I like it, the blurb doesn’t tell you much about the plot. Sometimes, this can indicate what type of story it’s going to be – it’s going to be character-based, atmospheric, told over decades, feeling timeless and almost dreamy. And it was all those things. But for some of you who like to know a fair bit about a book for dipping in, I’ll elaborate on the blurb.

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The story is set over 4-5 decades, with two perspectives, Ellis and Michael. They both tell the story of their lives, with events intertwining, as well as events spent apart. To me, one narrator came across as more truthful and reliable, while the other definitely left parts and feelings out. I love unreliable narration, and the fact that these characters are telling the same story with wildly different perspectives. The story unfolded so beautifully, without giving anything away until it did and you realised everything about what had happened and cried your eyes out alone on a Monday night.

I would highly recommend Tin Man if you loved Call Me By Your Name, which is a book that’s getting a lot of publicity at the moment because of the film adaptation that just’s come out (and is amazing!). I didn’t enjoy Call Me By Your Name as much as Tin Man, but it’s similarities are not ones to ignore. Both are set (and partly set) in hot countries, depicting a fleeting romance between two men. They are both told during a time when homosexuality was illegal in said countries, and yet not considered ‘historical’ fiction because the sixties/seventies/eighties are not that long ago. So, there’s your comparison.

Please read this book. It’s just shy of 200 words and will stay with you for a really long time.

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